Jeri Vogt will become only the second woman ever to serve on the Crawford County Board of Supervisors.

Vogt, a Democrat from Dow City who currently serves as the county treasurer, received the second highest number of votes in Tuesday’s supervisors’ race

Two incumbents, Kyle Schultz, of Charter Oak, and Eric Skoog, of Denison, both Republicans, received 3,330 votes and 2,920 votes, respectively. Vogt received 3,097 votes

Ty Rosburg, a Republican from Charter Oak, received 2,829 votes. It was also his first time to run for the board of supervisors.

Rosburg entered the race late, on August 27, through a nomination by the county party to fill a vacancy on the ballot. The vacancy was created when Steve Ulmer, of Arion, decided he would not continue to run for re-election and withdrew his name on August 20, the withdrawal deadline for county candidates nominated by the primary election process.

Vogt has been employed in the Crawford County Treasurer’s office for the past 44 years, the last 14 as the county treasurer. She announced her retirement from that office earlier this year when she decided to run for the board of supervisors.

The first woman to serve on the Crawford County Board of Supervisors was Edna “Eileen” Heiden, a Democrat from Denison.

Heiden died in December at the age of 88.

She was elected to the board of supervisors in November 1972 when she led a field of four candidates. According to the Crawford County Auditor’s Office, Heiden returned to the board of supervisor to fill a vacancy in 1984 and continued to serve through 1994.

The Crawford County Auditor’s Office said 136 absentee ballots are still out. These could be counted if they were postmarked by November 5 and are received by the auditor’s office by noon on November 13.

In addition, three provisional ballots were voted on Tuesday. An absentee and special voters’ precinct board will decide if these ballots can be counted.

Voter turnout in Crawford County was 54.7 percent.

Kehl and Leise elected to hospital board

Voters in Crawford County gave Greg Kehl and Sidney Leise their support in a three-person race for the Crawford County Memorial Hospital (CCMH) Board of Trustees.

Kehl, a pharmacist from Denison, was first elected to the board six years ago. He received 3,448 votes in Tuesday’s general election.

Leise, who lives on a farm south of Vail, received 2,965 votes in his first time to run for the hospital board. He is a retired respiratory therapist who served for 30 years at CCMH.

Rich Knowles, of Denison, received 1,657 votes. He also ran for the hospital board in 2012, 2014 and 2016.

Neddermeyer wins county treasurer’s race

Shari Neddermeyer emerged as the winner in Tuesday’s race for county treasurer.

She received 3,006 votes to 2,243 for Ami Kesterson-Ladwig.

Kesterson-Ladwig, a Democrat from Denison, is a deputy in the county treasurer’s office.

Neddermeyer, a Republican originally from Charter Oak and now from Denison, has been employed by the Iowa Department of Human Services for the last 20 years.

The current county treasurer, Jeri Vogt, announced her retirement from the position earlier this year and won a seat on the board of supervisors in Tuesday’s election.

Meeves re-elected as county recorder

Denise Meeves won her bid for re-election as the Crawford County Recorder, receiving 2,846 votes to 2,439 for challenger Kristi Kluender.

Meeves, a Democrat from rural Denison, has been the county recorder for 32 years.

Kluender, a Republican from Schleswig, is the city clerk/treasurer for the City of Schleswig and worked as a medical secretary at Eventide for 22 years before that.

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